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tvrgeek Avatar
tvrgeek Silver Member Scott S
Hillsborough, North Carolinia, USA   USA
1965 MG MGB
As I continue thinking about an Alpine build, I was thinking of alternative engines. The 2.8 Ford seems to be a current thought. What about others? Miata? 2.3 Ford? It has to be something with an OD automatic trans. 2.0 Chevy? Any thoughts on what fits without hood bulges or other ugly adaptations? No, not doing a V8. I4 or V6. Just enough to power an automatic and AC on the highway. 145 or so HP is enough. Lighter is always better. So is cheap. I have not heard many complements on the Roots engines, but what can be done with them? Can you get a real 125 or so out of them on the street? At least the head is independent ports, so doing a MegaSquirt might be fun. Just that darn T35 automatic.

Forgot to add, anyone put a blower on one? Can the take it?

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TigerDan Avatar
TigerDan Silver Member Dan Richardson
Greenwood, SC, USA   USA
1967 Sunbeam Alpine "Blue Boy"
1967 Sunbeam Alpine "Commodore Blue"
I like the 2.8 V6 Ford (Cologne) because it seems a "natural" after the Shelby V8 (Tiger) smiling smiley

Most of all you can utilize a late Mustang T5 or even an automatic with Overdrive (A4LD). I have all of the conversion components for your Alpine available too!

Very nice set up, if I must say so.



Keep'em-on-the-Road

'67 SV Commodore Blue V6
Restored & Modified w/2.8 V6 FORD, T5, A/C & Electric Power Steering
Tiger2Dan’s Link: ​ ​http://danr.mhartman.net/
PDF file on Converting your Alpine:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/13vKZ9JhB0vO8p2PrMl1x1qfCxh17xJIg_KCIo7HeFok/edit
?ts=5a51997d

SidecarDoug Doug R
Sparks, NV, USA   USA
You might want to check out www.BritishV8.org There are a lot of great " How I did it" articles about engine swaps in British cars of various makes and models. My personal thought would be to check out the Rover / Buick aluminum V8, which was produced from the early 60's up to 2004- first by Buick, then by Rover.
Not hard to find Land Rover and Range Rover collision damaged vehicles with decent engines, and the aftermarket stuff by companies like Edelbrock will fit, so putting a self-contained throttle body fuel injection system from FITech or Holley would allow eliminating much of the factory electronics. These engines weigh in at about 320 lbs - substantially lighter than the Tiger V8, and narrower across the rocker covers as well.

These engines were also used in Morgan +8, TVR, Triumph TR8, and MGB V8, as well as a wide variety of kit cars from across the pond.

I realize you are not looking to build a road scorcher - in standard tune, the pre-smog non-turbo Buicks were about 200 hp.

I owned a 1967 Alpine back in 1969-70, and it was fun to drive- when it ran... I have nothing good to say about the reliability of these engines, which are basically a Hillman engine with an aluminum head. ( Much more reliable in the smaller 1400cc 46hp Hillman Husky ).
I would advise using the steel wheels instead of wires - the wires will soon start to get out of tune if the spokes are not constantly adjusted when spirited driving is involved. I believe that MG used the same bolt pattern as the Alpine, so getting rid of wire wheel adapters should be relatively easy - you might even be able to sell the adapters and wire wheels to someone who is more interested in looks than performance ! There are also a lot of nice alloy wheels available, like the Panasports and other Minilite clones

I hope this helps

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tvrgeek Avatar
tvrgeek Silver Member Scott S
Hillsborough, North Carolinia, USA   USA
1965 MG MGB
Looked at a Series IV and decided it is just not enough bigger than my B, so looking at Avanti's now. If I did not have my B, I think a Colone/AOD would be just the thing.

cobralee1 Ron Lee
Burbank, CA, USA   USA
As Sidecar Doug stated, the Buick 215 aluminum engine fits right in....I put one in my '66 Alpine...no major alterations needed...front mount distributor so didn't have to touch the firewall...it has a Mustang T5 5 speed to go along with it. The block is about 170lbs lighter than a Ford V8 or small block Chevy...stock 215 motor produces about 165hp...I have a Edelbrock manifold with a 650cfm Holley, headers and a very mild hydraulic cam.

For more info on the Buick motor, click on www.aluminum v8.com. D&D Fabrications works exclusively with the 215 Buick motors.

Ron


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IMG_5828.JPG

TigerDan Avatar
TigerDan Silver Member Dan Richardson
Greenwood, SC, USA   USA
1967 Sunbeam Alpine "Blue Boy"
1967 Sunbeam Alpine "Commodore Blue"
That V8 kinda fills up the engine compartment.

Did you buy the engine mounts, transmission mounts and the other components necessary to install the V8?

What clutch components, such and slave cylinder and mount bracket?

Are you using the stock Alpine steering system or did you have to modify in some way to clear the exhaust?

How about the headers, are they readily available from the various vendors or did you fabricate them? Would like to see how you did your conversion.

Are you running dual exhaust or single ?

How about the rear axle, stock or modified? What gear ratio?

What radiator, stock or modified?

Lots of questions because there is a lot of enginesmiling smiley



Keep'em-on-the-Road

'67 SV Commodore Blue V6
Restored & Modified w/2.8 V6 FORD, T5, A/C & Electric Power Steering
Tiger2Dan’s Link: ​ ​http://danr.mhartman.net/
PDF file on Converting your Alpine:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/13vKZ9JhB0vO8p2PrMl1x1qfCxh17xJIg_KCIo7HeFok/edit
?ts=5a51997d

MGB19737 Tom Dinchuk
Wallkill,New York, USA   USA
I currently have a 2.8 Ford v6 in my 1965 Sunbeam Alpine. Without any real modifications ( removed emissions stuff added a weber carb and headers) it probably has 120hp but tons more torque than a stock alpine.
I found the t-5 tranny I initially used to be cumbersome. It came from a 96 mustang (World Class type) but was a pain to use especially in tight traffic; very stiff clutch action and gears which seemed out of synch with
my engine's sweet spots. I do have a 2006 six speed Miata so I know what a a nice engine / tranny setup feels like. Anyway, the car is currently at my friend's (Steve Shuttleton) restoration shop; where it will have a
rebuilt C4 mustang transmission installed. This will give me a daily driver I can enjoy. Bottom line .....Would I do the swap again? No, No and No. Even with a kit be prepared for a lot of work and surprises. Also remember
you are in fact creating a new car which (good or bad) won't be your Alpine anymore. If I was going to do this again I'd work on modifying my stock engine and add an overdrive. That being said, I can respect anyone else's
opinion about this ; I'm sure there are people who love the conversion also (different strokes for different folks).

TigerDan Avatar
TigerDan Silver Member Dan Richardson
Greenwood, SC, USA   USA
1967 Sunbeam Alpine "Blue Boy"
1967 Sunbeam Alpine "Commodore Blue"
Tom, What "kit" did you buy for your V6 Conversion?

The clutch being "stiff" is percance a result of the wrong selection of the Master Cylinder.

I have several of the Mustang T5's none of which relate to your experiences.

With you doing the automatic C4 (believe you have my Tranny bracket?) will be a smoother ride in relation to shifts. But, will you not still have your Alpinesmiling smiley ??

I installed an A/C in my Alpine (Blue Boy) when it still had the 1725 engine (+ rebuilt and increased HP). It ran well and provided a cool ride especially with the Hardtop. When stopped at a red light or other times in heavy traffic I had to idle the engine up..... Not a big problem.

But, installing the V6 utilizing my specially designed conversion components and continuing with the A/C made a world of difference, as you previously stated. Quote: ......tons more torque than a stock alpine. Unquote.

Be advised the rear ratio in some Alpine my cause the RPM to be high when running the Auto C3/4's I would seriously consider the A4LD because of the overdrive option.

Send some PIC's of you project. Very interested in the Auto tranny!

Keep'em-on-the-Road,



Keep'em-on-the-Road

'67 SV Commodore Blue V6
Restored & Modified w/2.8 V6 FORD, T5, A/C & Electric Power Steering
Tiger2Dan’s Link: ​ ​http://danr.mhartman.net/
PDF file on Converting your Alpine:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/13vKZ9JhB0vO8p2PrMl1x1qfCxh17xJIg_KCIo7HeFok/edit
?ts=5a51997d


Attachments:
V6 Measurements for C3 C4 is 35 inches 20180218_180825.jpg    27 KB
V6 Measurements for C3 C4 is 35 inches 20180218_180825.jpg

V6 C3 - C4 Tranny Bracket for manual Alpine 20170707_145207.jpg    30 KB
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MGB19737 Tom Dinchuk
Wallkill,New York, USA   USA
Hey Dan,
Nice to hear from you. I bought 'Jose's Kit for the conversion. As far as Master cylinders went through 3 different sizes (none really worked in a satisfactory way).
Clutch engagement was either too stiff or non existent; also went through at least 2-3 slaves. Did not like the stock clutch positioning for engagement either in
this application. I must note my new clutch was kind of heavy duty; that may be a factor also. As far as ''my Alpine'' (which I love)..... I was referring any
stock car after a conversion .......It becomes a one off special ( nothing wrong with that). I am going to explore different rear end ratios for the c4....
If you have any suggestions it would be appreciated. Will send some pictures down the line. What I was trying to say about vintage cars (my car included)
is that any performance upgrades give you at best a nice handling older vehicle. My Miata made me realize that. In other words appreciate each car (old or new)
for what it is or isn't.

TigerDan Avatar
TigerDan Silver Member Dan Richardson
Greenwood, SC, USA   USA
1967 Sunbeam Alpine "Blue Boy"
1967 Sunbeam Alpine "Commodore Blue"
Several keys for a good clutch is to match the Slave with the Master!

A friend of mine modified a brake pedal that changed the swing ratio for me. I've considered maybe doing something like that for the clutch. But, with mine working satisfactorily, I'll not fix what aint brokesmiling smiley

Rear ratio for the Alpine and a C4 maybe a 3:70.....I am considering a 3:55 for one of my projects with the A4LD.



Keep'em-on-the-Road

'67 SV Commodore Blue V6
Restored & Modified w/2.8 V6 FORD, T5, A/C & Electric Power Steering
Tiger2Dan’s Link: ​ ​http://danr.mhartman.net/
PDF file on Converting your Alpine:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/13vKZ9JhB0vO8p2PrMl1x1qfCxh17xJIg_KCIo7HeFok/edit
?ts=5a51997d

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